Cathodic Protection

Introduction

Impressed Current Cathodic Protection system (ICCP)

Simple impressed current cathodic protection system. A source of DC electric current is used to help drive the protective electrochemical reaction.

 

For larger structures, or where electrolyte resistivity is high, galvanic anodes cannot economically deliver enough current to provide protection. In these case, impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems are used. These consist of anodes connected to a DC power source, often a transformer-rectifier connected to AC power. In the absence of an AC supply, alternative power sources may be used, such as solar panels, wind power or gas powered thermoelectric generators.

 

Anodes for ICCP systems are available in a variety of shapes and sizes. Common anodes are tubular and solid rod shapes or continuous ribbons of various materials. These include high silicon cast iron, graphite, mixed metal oxide, platinum and niobium coated wire and other materials.

 

For pipelines, anodes are arranged in groundbeds either distributed or in a deep vertical holes depending on several design and field condition factors including current distribution requirements.

 

Cathodic protection transformer-rectifier units are often custom manufactured and equipped with a variety of features, including remote monitoring and control, integral current interrupters and various type of electrical enclosures. The output DC negative terminal is connected to the structure to be protected by the cathodic protection system. The rectifier output DC positive cable is connected to the anodes. The AC power cable is connected to the rectifier input terminals.

 

The output of the ICCP system should be optimised to provide enough current to provide protection to the target structure. Some cathodic protection transformer-rectifier units are designed with taps on the transformer windings and jumper terminals to select the voltage output of the ICCP system. Cathodic protection transformer-rectifier units for water tanks and used in other applications are made with solid state circuits to automatically adjust the operating voltage to maintain the optimum current output or structure-to-electrolyte potential. Analog or digital meters are often installed to show the operating voltage (DC and sometime AC) and current output. For shore structures and other large complex target structures, ICCP system are often designed with multiple independent zones of anodes with separate cathodic protection transformer-rectifier circuits.

 

Source: Wikipedia

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